ROSEMARY

Lipstick & Roses Ingredient

Other Names:

Rosmarinus Officinalis

Parts Used:

leaves, stems and essential oil

Skin Type:

All Skin Types; great for acne-prone and mature skin

Comedogenicity Rating:

2 – moderately low ability to clog pores

Natural SPF:

unknown

Region of Origin, Cultivation & History:

native to the Mediterranean; Rosemary has been extensively used since ancient times for a variety of purposes. The Romans gave special importance to the rosemary plant and used it frequently in religious ceremonies. It was also used during wedding ceremonies, food preparation, cosmetic care, and medicinal herbal care. Rosemary plant and its extract were also used by the ancient, Egyptian civilization as incense.

Constituents:

borneolcamphenecamphor, cineole, limonenelinalool, isobornyl acetate, 3-octanone, terpineol, verbenol, flavonoids, apigenin, diosmetin, diosmin, genkwanin, 6-methoxygenkwanin, hispidulin, sinensetin, luteolin, rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid, labiatic acid, diterpenes, picrosalvin, carnosolic acids, rosmariquinone, triterpenes, ursolic acid, oleanolic acid,

Health & Beauty Benefits:

anti-inflammatory, tonic, astringent, diaphoretic, stomachic, nervine, anodyne, antiseptic, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, anticonvulsant, anti-hepatotoxic, antioxidant,

Rosemary is used topically (applied to the skin) for preventing and treating baldness; and treating circulation problems, toothache, a skin condition called eczema, and joint or muscle pain such as myalgia, sciatica, and intercostal neuralgia. It is also used for wound healing, in bath therapy (balneotherapy), and as an insect repellent.

Rosemary oil and rosemary teas are widely used for hair care in shampoos and lotions. Regular use of rosemary oil helps to stimulate follicles, making hair grow longer and stronger. It is also believed that rosemary oil slows down premature hair loss and graying of the hair. Therefore, it is an excellent tonic for bald people or those who are beginning to show signs on male pattern baldness.

Rosemary essential oil is also beneficial for dry and flaky scalps. Regular massaging of the scalp with rosemary oil nourishes the scalp and removes dandruff. Furthermore, it is often mixed with tea tree oil and basil oil to alternately treat scalp problems. For many years, rosemary has been combined with olive oil as a way to darken and strengthen hair by using hot oil treatments.

Rosemary essential oil is not used in skin care as extensively as it is used in hair care, but it does have antimicrobial and antiseptic qualities that make it beneficial in efforts to eliminate eczema, dermatitis, oily skin, and acne. Topical application of the essential oil, or regular massage with the oil helps in toning your skin and removing dryness. It can also give your skin a healthy, even glow when regularly applied, or when it is a main component of your moisturizers and other creams.

Rosemary has a mesmerizing aroma, which makes rosemary essential oil an excellent inhalant. The oil is used in room fresheners, cosmetics, beauty aids, food, bath oil, candles and perfumes because of its unique and intoxicating aroma. When the oil is inhaled, it can boost mental energy and is also known to clear the respiratory tract. Many people spray a mixture of rosemary essential oil and water to remove bad odors from room and objects.

Warnings/Contraindications:

Rosemary is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts found in foods. Rosemary is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when used as a medicine when taken by mouth, applied to the skin, or inhaled as aromatherapy.

However, the undiluted oil is LIKELY UNSAFE to take by mouth. Taking large amounts of rosemary can cause vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, increased sun sensitivity, skin redness, and allergic reactions.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Rosemary is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts. Rosemary might stimulate menstruation or affect the uterus, causing a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of applying rosemary to the skin during pregnancy. If you are pregnant, it’s best to avoid rosemary in amounts larger than food amounts.

If you are breast-feeding, also steer clear of rosemary in medicinal amounts. Not enough is known about what effects it might have on the nursing infant.

Aspirin allergy. Rosemary contains a chemical that is very similar to aspirin. This chemical, known a as salicylate, may cause a reaction in people who are allergic to aspirin.

Bleeding disorders: Rosemary might increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in people with bleeding disorders. Use cautiously.

Seizure disorders: Rosemary might make seizure disorders worse. Don’t use it.

Rosemary oil may, at times, cause allergic reactions, so it should only be used if prescribed or after thorough consultation with your medical specialist. Since rosemary oil is volatile in nature, the oil has occasionally caused vomiting and spasms. Therefore, it should never be ingested. It is strongly suggested that rosemary essential oil should not be used by pregnant, breastfeeding, or nursing women. Excessive use of the oil may even lead to miscarriage or a disability in the fetus.

 

“Rosemary” Potters Herbal Encyclopedia (Williamson) [CW Daniel Company Limited 2003] pgs. 378-379

www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-154-ROSEMARY.aspx?activeIngredientId=154&activeIngredientName=ROSEMARY&source=2

Rosemary Oil

Health Benefits of Rosemary Oil